Posts Tagged ‘data lake’

Lifting Healthcare Out Of Its Digital Malaise

David Dimond

David Dimond

Chief Technology Officer and Distinguished Engineer, Global Healthcare at Dell EMC
David Dimond

Latest posts by David Dimond (see all)

The power of data in healthcare is nothing new. In 1846, a Hungarian doctor named Ignaz Semmelweis collected data to uncover why so many women in maternity wards were dying from childbed fever. After several outlandish theories, he discovered that medical students were transferring cadaverous particles from autopsies and thus one of the first infection-control hand-washing protocols was born. As a result, the rate of childbed fever fell dramatically. By using data to reach his conclusion, Dr. Semmelweis was a data scientist before his time.
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The Human Face of Big Data: The Documentary

Nina Hargus

Nina Hargus

Senior Vice President, Global Field and Partner Marketing at Dell EMC

“Big Data” was not yet a household term when EMC sponsored The Human Face of Big Data more than three years ago. To help the general public understand how technology’s ability to gather, store and analyze massive amounts of information will change our lives, EMC underwrote production of the book by Rick Smolan, creator of the wildly popular “Day in the Life” series of photography books. Three years later, talk of Big Data has moved on to Data Lakes that can now bring data, analytics and applications together seamlessly, enabling organizations to run analytics across all of their data, acting on insights and building new capabilities that were unimaginable before.

To see how The Human Face of Data project has evolved, tune in to the hour-long documentary set to air tonight on PBS stations at 10pm ET (check local listings for viewing details).

Putting Healthcare Data to Work

David Dimond

David Dimond

Chief Technology Officer and Distinguished Engineer, Global Healthcare at Dell EMC
David Dimond

Latest posts by David Dimond (see all)

Technology continues to change how we work and play. As consumers, we are living in an Information Generation that is more digitally connected to each other through the things we use and the experiences they enable. For businesses, all this data creates a clearer picture of our customers and what they both need and want. And, for healthcare organizations, gaining that clear picture on a particular patient in real-time can be critical at the point of care. (more…)

Using Big Data Technology for Social Good

John Cardente

John Cardente

Distinguished Engineer at EMC
John Cardente is a Big Data and Analytics technologist within the Corporate CTO Office of EMC, a global leader in enabling businesses and service providers to transform their operations and deliver information technology as a service. In this role, John helps define EMC's Big Data strategy and leads joint proof-of-concept projects across divisions, federation companies (VMWare and Pivotal), and industry partners. During his eighteen years with the company, John has helped pioneer, as an individual contributor and leader of advanced development teams, the adoption of notable innovations including solid-state disks, automated data tiering, storage virtualization technologies, and embedded operating system emulators. John holds Bachelor and Master degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and an MBA from Northeastern University. He recently earned a Graduate Certificate in Mining Massive Data Sets from Stanford University, a four course program that covers the theory and practice of many big data and machine learning technologies. John is a named inventor on ten granted U.S. patents with additional patents pending. In 2011, John was named an EMC Distinguished Engineer, a title held by less than 1% of EMC's global engineering population.
John Cardente

Latest posts by John Cardente (see all)

5679642883_24a2e905e0_zEarth’s climate is changing. The rising global temperature, shrinking ice sheets, and increase in extreme weather events all serve as evidence that the phenomenon is real. These direct effects are relatively easy to measure due to their global scale, but identifying the indirect effects happening at smaller scales is more challenging.  (more…)

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